Friday, April 18, 2014

Inadequate Training Lawsuits

July 12, 2010 by  
Filed under Real Ammunition

McLeod vs. City of Philadelphia (U.S. District Ct., No. 94-7495, Oct. 6, 1995, 39
ATLA L. Rptr. P. 56, March 1996)

This case involved a $2,200,200.00 settlement in a case where a police officer
allegedly shot a man who was helping a store clerk who had been shot during a robbery.
This case illustrates the need to train officers in shoot no-shoot situations.

Watson vs. City of Los Angeles (No. BC085132, L.A. Superior Central Ct.,
California, Dec. 29, 1995, L.A. Daily Journal Verdicts & Settlements, Vol. 109, No.
77, p.5, April 19,1996)

In this case a jury awarded a man $4,911,668 who was shot and rendered a paraplegic by
the officer pursuing him as he fled from a stopped vehicle, because of outstanding
warrants and illegal possession of a firearm. The plaintiff claimed he had abandoned the
weapon before the officer shot him. Subsequently, a $3.5 million settlement was agreed
to.
This case illustrates the need to train officers in the constitutional limitations on the use
of deadly force and department policy on the use of deadly force.

Camacho vs. City of Cudahy (VC009187, La. Superior Ct., March 31, 1994)

In this case the city was held liable for a $4,370.000 settlement to surviving family of a
man shot and killed by officer responding to a domestic disturbance call who thought a
stick in the man’s hand as he came out of an apartment was a rifle.
This case illustrates the need to train officers in shoot no-shoot situations.

Acosta vs. City and County of San Fransico (83 F. 3d 1143, 9th Circuit 1996)

In this case a Federal Appeals Court reinstated a jury’s $259,358.19 judgement against the officer for shooting and killing driver of a car making an escape from an alleged purse snatching. The jury necessarily found that officer could not have reasonably believed
himself in danger from a slow moving vehicle, and accordingly officer was not entitled to
qualified immunity.
This case illustrates the need to train officers on constitutional limitations of the use of
deadly force.

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